conflicts-of-interesteconomic justiceInvestment Abuses

Want to Rig the World’s Biggest Market? No Problem.

Want to rig the world’s largest financial market?  No problem.

At least that is what prosecutors in the U.S. and the UK are saying when it comes to their charges that three of the world’s largest global banks rigged parts of the $5.3 trillion a day foreign exchange market.

Just to get an idea about how big this market is, the $5.3 trillion per day in trading volume dwarfs the equities and futures markets. In fact, it would take thirty days of trading on the New York stock exchange to equal one day of Forex trading, according to a 2014 calculation.

In the latest episode of this huge, slow motion felony that affected millions of unsuspecting investors worldwide covered on this web site, Federal prosecutors are discussing ways for three U.K.-based traders to surrender to U.S. authorities, so they can be prosecuted here, as well as in the UK.  

The three traders worked in senior-level trading positions for Barclays, JPMorgan Chase and Citibank, some of the largest banks in the world. The three traders were charged in January with conspiring to rig exchange markets through discussions in an electronic chat room known as The Cartel, according to a news report on Bloomberg news.

The Cartel met online in a chatroom “The Cartel” that was set up by a senior employee of the oil and gas firm, BP Plc., (formerly British Petroleum) and included currency dealers at JPMorgan, Citigroup Inc., Barclays Plc and UBS Group AG. 

The wheels of justice move lowly, and in some cases, not at all, but in this case, UK legal officials worked to cite the chat room messages between the currency traders and the UKs largest energy company into a huge scandal that Bloomberg news said has enveloped 11 banks and forced over 30 traders from London to Singapore to lose or be suspended from their jobs. In November 2013, six banks were fined $4.3 billion for trading against their clients and colluding to rig the foreign-exchange markets.

If nothing else, the traders and their banks were ambitious.  The FX rigging scandal follows other scandals to rig the LIBOR, silver and gold markets. If this is something the average [person cannot comprehend, don’t be surprised. 

These things happen when you have  hundreds of well-paid traders with vast sums of trading money, huge computer networks ,a lot of time on their hands, and best of all, get hundreds of thousands, and sometimes millions of dollars in bonuses for profitable trades they make for their banks. It really doesn’t matter how they won, it just matters that they won. At least that’s the prevailing bank culture’s official policies until they get caught.

So as of this writing, it’s unclear if anyone will go to jail or if the banks will continue to use their institutionalized “get-out-of-jail-free” cards. Those cards worked wonders during the 2007 mortgage crisis, so there is no reason why they should not work just as well in 2017, in the US and with the Trump administration’s Justice Department and SEC in power.

Scandals like bid rigging also do wonders for the confidence of individual investors, so it is no wonder that the nation’s largest banks, such as Wells Fargo, should be concerned about whether their investors and customer trust them with their money. After these global scandals, would you?

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Chuck Epstein

Chuck Epstein

Chuck Epstein has managed marketing communications and public relations departments for major global financial institutions and participated in the launch of industry-changing financial products. He also has written by-lined articles for over 50 publications, five books and served as editor and publisher of nation’s first newsletter on the topic of using the PC for personal investing and trading. (“Investing Online, 1994-1999). He also is a marketing consultant, writer and speaker on topics related to investor protection and opportunities in the very dynamic cannabis industry.

He has held senior-level marketing, PR and communications positions at the New York Futures Exchange, Chicago Mercantile Exchange, Lind-Waldock, Zacks Investment Research, Russell Investments and Principal Financial.

He has won national awards from the Mutual Fund Education Alliance (MFEA) and his web site, www.mutualfundreform.com, was named best small blog in 2009 by the Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW).

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